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Craig Shirley – Guest Speaker at Indian Creek Yacht & Country Club – November 11

DINNER & SPEAKER WITH AUTHOR CRAIG SHIRLEY
Friday, November 11 – 6 p.m. $25 per person

Indian Creek Yacht & Country Club
Kilmarnock VA 22482

Author of three bestsellers on former U.S. president Ronald Reagan Rendezvous with Destiny: Ronald Reagan and the Campaign that Changed America (2014), Reagan’s Revolution: The Untold Story of the Campaign That Started It All (2005), and Last Act: The Final Years and emerging Legacy of Ronald Reagan (2015). His book December 1941: 31 Days that Changed America and Saved the World (2011) appeared multiple times on the New York Times bestselling list in December 2011 and January 2012, while Last Act was named best narrative in the non-fiction category by USA Book News for 2015.

Craig has been named the First Reagan Scholar at Eureka College, Ronald Reagan’s alma mater, where he taught a course titled “Reagan 101.”

Dinner Choices: Veal Osso Buco or Hamburger Soup with Tomato and Hominy

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How Trump won and why so many people were surprised || Philly

How Trump won and why so many people were surprised

by Thomas Fitzgerald

People said Donald Trump would not, could not, happen.

Those who analyze and practice politics – most of them, anyway – said there was no way a nation that had twice elected President Obama would choose a successor who had been a leader of the “birther” movement undermining the legitimacy of the first black president.

Obama enjoys a high approval rating, 58 percent in some recent polls, a marker that usually suggests a degree of voter satisfaction. It was interpreted as a good sign for Democrat Hillary Clinton, running in effect for the incumbent’s third term.

And aren’t demographics destiny? Experts have pointed for years to growing minority groups, particularly Hispanics, and the inevitability of a majority-minority nation; the white share of the electorate has been falling steadily for decades.

Yet Trump won on the strength of a base of white working-class voters, and his campaign included themes of racial resentment, both overt and subtle, that appealed to some supporters feeling under siege by increasing globalization and multiculturalism.

The developer and reality-TV star vowed to smash the political and business elites that he sees as pushing job-killing free-trade deals and “political correctness.” That message resonated with enough voters to build a winning coalition for Trump.

Elections are complex, and there are multiple chains of cause-and-effect that could explain why Trump upended expectations so soundly. The factors will be studied for years. Here are some early attempts at explanation.

Change vs. More of the Same. Obama’s likability obscured dissatisfaction and a deep hunger for change. Persistent and large majorities of voters have in polls raised the concern that the country is on the wrong track, but many analysts, including Clinton campaign strategists, assumed that the presidential approval rating was the more meaningful predictive statistic because it had always correlated with the odds of an incumbent party maintaining control of the White House.

“There was a movement that was forming that had been building for decades, a backlash against economic and cultural globalism,” said Republican strategist Bruce Haynes, cofounder of the firm Purple Strategies in Washington. Voters, he said, wanted change.

“The personification of that change was not as important as change itself,” Haynes said, and Clinton was the status quo.

After all, just 38 percent of voters in exit polls said that Trump was qualified to be president, which means about one in five of the voters who pulled the lever for him did so while thinking him not ready for the job.

What we have here is a failure to communicate. It was easy to find attendees at Trump rallies all over the country who acknowledged their candidate’s imperfection, but said it was important to shatter the system or, in a phrase that caught on in the last days of the campaign, to “drain the swamp” of Washington.

“There is this disconnect. It’s palpable,” said David Dunphy, a Philadelphia-based Democratic strategist. “People felt nobody was listening. I always believed they would reject Trump as a person, on the basis of his character, but I was wrong.”

The political and media classes were stunned that anybody would believe Trump’s outlandish promises, claims, and attacks – to build a border wall with Mexico and get Mexico to pay for it, for example, or that he knew more than the generals about how to wipe out the Islamic State.

Conservative columnist Salena Zito of the New York Post argued that most Trump supporters were not fooled. She wrote that the media took Trump literally, but not seriously. His loyalists took him seriously, but not literally.

“I’m not voting for his character,” Mike Straub, 34, a union painter from Bensalem, said Tuesday. “I don’t agree with a lot of things he says. I don’t think this is how he’s going to be if he becomes president.”

Straub, a registered Republican, liked Trump’s plan to tax products shipped to the United States by companies that move jobs overseas. He doesn’t believe that the mogul can wave a wand and restore the nation’s manufacturing base overnight, but says Trump’s policies could slow the flow of jobs out of the country.

Jennie Stevens, 45, a Trump supporter and volunteer in Springfield, Ohio, said recently that she was not alarmed by his bellicose words.

“Is he going to go nuke somebody? No, he’s not,” Stevens said. “I know that.”

Instead, she said, she understands the tough talk as symbolic of the idea that Trump will stand up for the U.S. abroad more than Obama.

Pendulums swing. Craig Shirley, a conservative political consultant and respected biographer of President Ronald Reagan, said there was a similar “dynamic” in Reagan’s and Trump’s victories: Both were outsiders, despised by Washington elites initially as boobs.

“There is a populist dialectic to American history,” Shirley said in an interview. “Every generation and a half, there’s an uprising.”

In 1800, it was Thomas Jefferson, he said. Later in that century, came Andrew Jackson, and eventually Theodore Roosevelt, FDR, and Ronald Reagan in 1980.

“Each of them stands against the corrupting influence of bigness, sometimes of government, sometimes of corporations,” Shirley said. “Conservatism is about expanding individual freedom against that bigness, that power.” Trump spoke against both big government and private special interests in his campaign.

“Is he going to go nuke somebody? No, he’s not,” Stevens said. “I know that.”

Instead, she said, she understands the tough talk as symbolic of the idea that Trump will stand up for the U.S. abroad more than Obama.

Pendulums swing. Craig Shirley, a conservative political consultant and respected biographer of President Ronald Reagan, said there was a similar “dynamic” in Reagan’s and Trump’s victories: Both were outsiders, despised by Washington elites initially as boobs.

“There is a populist dialectic to American history,” Shirley said in an interview. “Every generation and a half, there’s an uprising.”

In 1800, it was Thomas Jefferson, he said. Later in that century, came Andrew Jackson, and eventually Theodore Roosevelt, FDR, and Ronald Reagan in 1980.

“Each of them stands against the corrupting influence of bigness, sometimes of government, sometimes of corporations,” Shirley said. “Conservatism is about expanding individual freedom against that bigness, that power.” Trump spoke against both big government and private special interests in his campaign.

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75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor the subject of UofM’s December 1 lecture || Local15TV

75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor the subject of UofM’s December 1 lecture

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Craig Shirley, a nationally recognized author, historian, and political commentator, will deliver a lecture titled “December 1941: 31 Days That Changed America and Saved the World” as this year’s installment of University of Mobile’s Billy G. Hinson Lecture Series.

According to Dr. Lonnie Burnett, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UM and director of the lecture series, Shirley will examine the crucial days that propelled the United States into the most devastating war in human history.

The talk will be held Thursday, Dec. 1 at 7 p.m. in Ram Hall on the University of Mobile campus. The program, which includes the lecture and a book signing, is free and open to the public.

Shirley is the author of three bestsellers on former U.S. president Ronald Reagan: “Rendezvous with Destiny: Ronald Reagan and the Campaign that Changed America” (2014), “Reagan’s Revolution: The Untold Story of the Campaign That Started It All” (2005), and “Last Act: The Final Years and Emerging Legacy of Ronald Reagan” (2015). His book “December 1941: 31 Days that Changed America and Saved the World” (2011) appeared multiple times on the New York Times bestselling list in December 2011 and January 2012, while Last Act was named best narrative in the non-fiction category by USA Book News for 2015.

A widely sought-after speaker and commentator, Shirley appears regularly on many network and cable shows including NewsMaxTV, FOX News, MSNBC, CNN, ABC, CBS, CNBC, C-SPAN and others. He has also written extensively for the Washington Post, NewsMax, the Washington Examiner, the Washington Times, the Los Angeles Times, Town Hall, the Weekly Standard, Politico, Reuters, Lifezette and many other publications.

The Billy G. Hinson Series was established by the University of Mobile College of Arts and Sciences to present academic programs dealing with major topics in American history. The series is named in honor of Dr. Billy Hinson, long-time history professor at the university. For more information, contact Burnett at 251.442.2319 or [email protected]

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Phyllis Schlafly, towering social conservative figure, dies at 92 || CNN

Phyllis Schlafly, towering social conservative figure, dies at 92

By Theodore Schleifer and Stephen Collinson, CNN

Washington (CNN)Phyllis Schlafly, a prominent anti-feminist and early leader of the social conservative movement, died Monday at the age of 92 at her home in St. Louis.

Schlafly, an outspoken voice against the liberalism of the 1960’s and 1970’s, was a towering figure in what emerged as the modern religious right. Her death was confirmed by the Eagle Forum, the Missouri-based advocacy organization she led.
“Her focus from her earliest days until her final ones was protecting the family, which she understood as the building block of life. She recognized America as the greatest political embodiment of those values,” the statement read. “From military superiority and defense to immigration and trade; from unborn life to the nuclear family and parenthood, Phyllis Schlafly was a courageous and articulate voice for common sense and traditional values.”
Schlafly was most well-known for her work fighting the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970’s, emerging as one of the leading female critics of the feminist movement.
Schlafly, until her death, remained in the political arena and recently made the case for electing Donald Trump president. On Monday night the Republican nominee eulogized Schlafly in a statement.
“Phyllis Schlafly is a conservative icon who led millions to action, reshaped the conservative movement, and fearlessly battled globalism and the ‘kingmakers’ on behalf of America’s workers and families,” Trump said. “I was honored to spend time with her during this campaign as she waged one more great battle for national sovereignty.”
In her final days, Schlafly caused consternation among some conservatives by backing Trump.
She endorsed the billionaire at a rally in her home city of St. Louis, Missouri in March, despite the fact many of her fellow travelers in the movement don’t see the Republican candidate as a true ideological conservative, likening him to Ronald Reagan.
“I can remember 1980 when a lot of us didn’t think Reagan was an authentic conservative,” Schlafly told CNN in an interview in May.
“Reagan turned out to be best president of the century,” she said. She backed Trump partly because he was the only candidate talking about illegal immigration, which she said was “the most important issue in the country.”
In a statement Monday night Reagan biographer Craig Shirley called Schlafly the “First Lady” of the American conservative movement.
“Her legacy helped conservatives understand they had a choice and were not simply an echo,” Shirley said. “She battled, she won, she confounded the radical left-wing feminists time and again. Frankly, she was smarter and tougher than the liberals she fought and conquered so joyously. The defeat of the so-called Equal Rights Amendment stands as but one of many monuments to her legacy.”
Funeral arrangements are still being finalized, according to the Eagle Forum.

Phyllis Schlafly, a Forceful Conservative Voice for Decades, Dies at 92 || New York Magazine

Phyllis Schlafly, a Forceful Conservative Voice for Decades, Dies at 92

By Theresa Avila

Phyllis Schlafly, a conservative — if not notorious — icon for generations who propelled a new political movement starting in the 50s into force, died at her home in St. Louis. She was 92.

Schlafly was an outspoken critic of feminism and grew into a significant political and cultural force during her life. Her strong opposition to communism, abortion, feminism, and an overall focus on the nuclear family, made her a darling of the emerging conservative movement. So much so, that she earned herself the moniker, “The First Lady of the conservative movement.”

Richard Viguerie, who has helped finance right-wing causes, referred to her as such in the New York Times, while Reagan biographer Craig Shirley did so in a statement to CNN. “Her legacy helped conservatives understand they had a choice and were not simply an echo,” Shirley said. “She battled, she won, she confounded the radical left-wing feminists time and again. Frankly, she was smarter and tougher than the liberals she fought and conquered so joyously.”
Schlafly would go on to say that she was most proud of founding the Eagle Forum in 1975, a conservative organization still in existence, according to NPR. Her legacy and name, however, will forever remain associated with the eventual defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment, which would have barred gender-based discrimination in federal and state laws. The constitutional amendment came close to passage when both chambers of Congress passed it in 1972 and 35 states ratified it. It lost traction in the following years, however, and failed to get the additional three states needed for adoption. Historians credit Schlafly and her political-organizing capabilities as playing an important role in the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment.

Schlafly continued fighting for conservative causes throughout her life, most recently endorsing Donald Trump for president. While she baffled feminists for almost two generations and earned their ire, she also galvanized a new conservative, religious movement into becoming a political force that remains to this day.

She is survived by six children and 16 grandchildren.

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